Monthly Archives: April 2015

Event report: An introduction to copyright (Part 2)

ARLG NW offered two free chartership places to our Spring event, An Introduction to Copyright. Both chartership candidates wrote for us their thoughts on the event. Our second post is by Lynn Roberts-Maloney, Digital Resources and Collections Assistant, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. 

Gordon Sandison from the University of Liverpool Library presents on their digitisation pilot.

Gordon Sandison from the University of Liverpool Library presents on their digitisation pilot.

I attended my first ARLG event on Friday 27th March 2015 – ‘An Introduction to Copyright’. Copyright is a subject that I personally find quite challenging so it was a perfect opportunity to increase my awareness of this tricky subject. I have recently enrolled for Chartership and on reading through the PKSB I had identified point 5.3 Copyright, intellectual property and licensing under section 5. Information Governance and Compliance as one of the areas I would like work on. Therefore I was delighted to see this event advertised and I was very fortunate to gain one of the free Chartership places kindly offered by ARLG.

The speakers – John Kelly from Jisc, Neil Sprunt from University of Manchester, Louise Koch from Manchester Met, and Gordon Sandison from University of Liverpool – were engaging and very informative providing details of copyright in practice. John Kelly provided a background to copyright legislation and explained the new updates to the policy that were introduced in 2014. Neil, Louise and Gordon’s presentations about copyright in their respective Universities, particularly in relation to managing digital content, gave valuable insight to the complexities and challenges of complying with copyright in an educational setting. As I work in an institution that has recently been granted Higher Education Status I particularly found this part of the afternoon very interesting. I came away from the event feeling more informed about copyright in general but also with ideas to look at how things are done within my own institution and what, if any, changes we can implement to make copyright compliance a priority and in turn easier to manage and achieve.

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Captain Copyright himself – Neil Sprunt from the University of Manchester library.

 

The ARLG NW committee are very pleased that both our chartership attendees found the event valuable and were able to write for us on their experiences. Thanks again to all of our speakers and attendees for making it such a successful afternoon. 

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Event report: An introduction to copyright

ARLG NW offered two free chartership places to our Spring event, An Introduction to Copyright. Both chartership candidates wrote for us their thoughts on the event. Our first post is from Evelyn Webster, Library Officer at Pinsent Masons LLP (Leeds office).

I was extremely grateful to have gotten one of the chartership places offered for this event, so that I could find out how students and academics commonly use copyrighted material, and how libraries try to regulate that use.

I was not expecting to see so many parallels with my experience working in a commercial law firm library, because the assumption is that more copying is permitted for educational use than for commercial use. As John Kelly explained, that’s true if you’re relying on statutory exceptions, but in reality the CLA HE and law firm licences allow both types of organisation to do largely the same things – the law firm licence just costs more per person.

In addition, libraries face the same types of challenges (i.e. users assume that because they found something online, or because their library has a copy, that it’s okay to redistribute it), and the same complications (i.e. there are different licences and permissions for different materials, uses and users).

The three presentations from Manchester, MMU and Liverpool universities showed ways in which libraries are making it easy for users to comply with – and fully exploit – the licences available, without overburdening the library staff.

MMU and Liverpool libraries are aiming to provide the easiest way for lecturers to offer course materials to students electronically, by integrating a digitisation request and copyright check facility into their existing reading list software. Manchester library are aiming to provide the easiest way for academics and students to check whether they can do X with Y, via their copyright webpages, FAQs and upcoming click-through flowchart.

I came away with a lot of ideas (as well as confidence and motivation) to help refresh our firm’s copyright guidance – after all, no one wants to be the test case for copyright infringement!

Our panel answer questions from the audience near the end of the afternoon.

Our panel answer questions from the audience near the end of the afternoon.

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