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Slides from Social media: Can you tell if it’s working yet?

On Friday 1st July we held our summer event, “Social media: Can you tell if it’s working yet?”. We really enjoyed the afternoon – thanks to everyone who attended.

As promised, please find below the slides from the afternoon. If you have any questions, please contact us by leaving a comment or tweeting us @ARLGNW.

Sarah Mallen and Michelle Bond – ARLG NW event slides July 2016 (PPT)

Tom Mason – ARLGNW Presentation 1.07 (PDF)

 

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ARLG NW presents Social media: Can you tell if it’s working yet?

Date: Friday 1st July 2016, 1.30 (for a 1.45pm start) to 4.30pm

Location: Manchester Central Library

Event description:
ARLG NW are pleased to announce our summer event, “Social media: Can you tell if it’s working yet?”

So your service has started dabbling in social media, or you’ve been working on it for a while. But do you know if it’s working? Is it worth the time and effort you’re putting in? And do you know what your goals are? What’s the point of your social media presence? This afternoon event will address all these questions and more. This event is suitable for people at all stages of planning for their social media presence.

Outline of afternoon

1.30pm-1.45pm Arrival for 1.45pm start

1.45pm – 2.30pm  Experiences of social media, policy and practice

Sarah Mallen, Information & guidance coordinator at University of Manchester Careers Service & Michelle Bond, Faculty Librarian at Liverpool Hope University 

Sarah and Michelle will talk about their experiences of running social media accounts for their services, with a focus on process and why it’s important to get organised and set goals. They’ll consider important questions such as “what do you hope to achieve?” and “what messages do you want to get across?”

2.15pm – 3.00pm Tom Mason, Social Media Coordinator, Communications & Marketing, The University of Manchester

Tom will be talking about social media from a wider university perspective, covering areas such as which social media to use, analytics, and tips and tricks to encourage engagement.

3-3.15pm Refreshments

3.15pm-4.00pm Creating your social media framework / policy – activity

Working in small groups, attendees will have the opportunity to start work on their own social media framework or policy, specific to their institution. This is also an opportunity to exchange experiences with other attendees, and get support from Sarah, Michelle and Tom in creating your own policy.

4pm-4.30pm   Your experiences – Advice & questions from the floor

The final session is for attendees to share experiences with the wider group and ask any final questions of the presenters or other attendees. We’ll bring together the strands of the afternoon and try to create a master list of tips.

Booking information:

Cost?  £20 + VAT for non-members

£15 + VAT for CILIP members

£5 for students

To book your place, please email Annette Ramsden ARamsden@uclan.ac.uk with the following details:

Name:

Institution (if applicable)

CILIP membership number (if applicable)

Name and address for invoicing

Access or support requirement

Booking deadline: Friday 17th June 2016

CILIP’s Professional Knowledge and Skills Base (PKSB) – this event is linked to the following criteria:

  1. Customer focus, service design and marketing: 11.2 Communicating with stakeholders
  2. IT and communication: 12.4 Social Media and Collaborative Tools
  3. IT and communication: 12.5 Communication Skills

Day in the life …. Careers Information & Guidance Coordinator

Introducing a semi-regular series on our blog… “Day in the life”. We’ve invited ARLG NW committee members to tell you about their days to reflect the range of roles we represent, and hope you enjoy the results. If you, as an ARLG NW member, would like to contribute your own day, please get in touch with the committee by commenting on this post or tweeting us @ARLGNW

First up is Sarah Mallen, one of our Twitter managers and a Careers Information & Guidance Co-ordinator at the University of Manchester.

Sarah - info team.jpg

Sarah (on the left) and her team at Christmas.

Background

I work at a University in the Careers Service. My job title used to be Information Manager & when I started many years ago it was all about managing paper resources; thousands of employer brochures and application forms plus a large Careers Library.

As you can guess the internet changed all that, now all the employer information is online and my role is more about making online information accessible to students.  I manage the student facing website and a team of staff including information and advisory staff.

A typical day

There is no typical day, and that’s what I like about this job and why I have stayed in it for more than 15 years now.

The year is basically split into times when most of my day is spent talking to students and times when it’s quiet and I work on the website, publications and random other stuff. It’s February so it’s busy at times particularly in the afternoons and in-between lectures. Typical enquiries at this time of year range from helping students with getting started thinking about career options, help with interviews and assessment centres and students who have multiple job offers and need help deciding between them (lucky them).

Enquiries come by phone, email and in person, usually the best thing is for us to have a chat to determine what level of help is needed and then we can either help the student ourselves or book them an appointment. Most of our phone calls today seem to be student cancelling appointments at short notice – like the NHS, nonattendance is a big problem for us. Fairly typically one of our advising staff had a home emergency which could have meant cancelling all their appointments with no notice. Fortunately that was averted as it’s never a happy task as we don’t have spare staff to see students so they have to wait longer.

Today is our first live day trialling some live chat software, it’s a very soft launch while we get used to it, but it will be publicised for an event next week.  We are all on alert waiting for the ping that means someone is talking to us. We all got very excited when our first student asked a question!

It’s the start of our second semester and we only have a short window when students will be interested in Careers before its Easter and assignment deadlines then exams. We have lots of events and programmes that launch over the next week so there has been a lot of last minute web editing getting it all ready. Unfortunately changes to the website often mean changes to our publications, as I updated them all over the summer to make them disability compliant I have delegated the job this time.

In other news, I have also taken on responsibility for our staff website and am currently working on a short questionnaire to go out to staff to find out what they want from us and what format they want it in. I’m currently looking into costings for a kiosk so that students can check themselves in for appointments. Currently we use a PC near our desk but it would be much better near the entrance.  The biggest sticking point seems to be getting estates to come out and give me a quote for power and data!

Some days seem to consist of nothing but HR paperwork, timesheets and rotas, but generally I can decide what I want to do when around the enquiry work. It’s an interesting place to work if you like hearing people’s stories and helping them make sense of the world.

What would I save if there was a fire? (humans excepted)

The biscuit tin, I’m not sure the team could survive a fire without biscuits!

Event report 2: Making your message stick, with Ned Potter

ARLG NW and CILIP NW offered 2 free student places for our October event, Making your message stick, with Ned Potter. We’re pleased to present write-ups from both students. We published the first yesterday, by Christine Tate. Today is Katie Nicholas’ turn. Katie’s a student at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Prior to this training I had a basic understanding of how to create a PowerPoint but Ned’s training introduced me to so many features I had never made proper use of, including picture formatting options and textbox features. Tips about using minimal space on the slide and the importance of fonts have already been incredibly useful for presentations I am delivering at university and for work.

Ned introduced us to a plethora of great websites where one can source images to create backgrounds without breaching any copyright laws or licenses. The time provided in the session to try each resource and experiment with PowerPoint meant I could ask questions whilst using the new tools. This meant I felt more equipped to use them on my own after the session. The training also gave advice on using these techniques in real-world situations such as working with organisational templates and branding.

The training offered advice on lowering the risk of technical issues by describing the anatomy of a slide and issues with projector alignment – for example not placing vital points near the top or bottom of a slide where they may be lost or obstructed by members of the audience or the projector screen. It is easy to forget about delivering a presentation for real when you are immersed in creating content, making the presentation aesthetically pleasing and remembering what to say so this was a welcome reminder.

The afternoon sessions gave an introduction to Prezi and an overview of presentation and communication skills. I was aware of Prezi but had never used it and was unsure how it worked. Ned effectively used a Prezi to explain the features, pros and cons and most importantly when not to use it. The main message I took away was that Prezi is great for specific kinds of presentations but should be used with caution. Practice is also a necessity! The interactivity and zoom in and out features are fantastic for dipping in and out of material or if you want a more holistic approach as the user sees the whole presentation from the start. Ned advised us to map out our Prezi before adding text and images in the online templates to create more cohesive end results – this was helpful as it is quite a different way of approaching presentations compared to PowerPoint where you can input a structure into slides and amend the visual features later.

By outlining the pitfalls and strengths of Prezi I felt more comfortable experimenting with the templates available and armed with enough knowledge to know when it may be appropriate to use.

The final session gave concise and cohesive advice about planning and preparing any presentation. The importance of researching, structuring and practicing your presentation was highlighted and tips like using the 3:3:3 approach will help organise my ideas in future. Tips on timing information on slides, rehearsing and familiarising yourself with the material and not just memorising will all help me deliver better presentations.

The day has given me lots of resources, tips and real-world advice that I am already venturing to use and has reminded me of the effectiveness and potential of PowerPoint when used in different ways.

Thanks to both Christine and Katie for their thoughts, and to Ned for hosting the workshop.

Event report: Making your message stick

ARLG NW and CILIP NW offered 2 free student places for our October event, Making your message stick, with Ned Potter. We’re pleased to present write-ups from both students. The first is from Christine Tate, a current student studying the MA in Library and Information Management at Manchester Metropolitan University.

I was pleased to receive a student place on the ‘making your message stick’ event by CILIP NW Member Network and ARLG NW. I am a full time student on the MA in library and information management course and I thought that this event would be a valuable opportunity to develop my presentation skills.

The workshop was led by Ned Potter and we started the day with a presentation on how to create Powerpoint presentations that would engage your audience and leave them thinking about your key message. Ned explained that your presentation should address the overlap between what you know and what your audience wants or needs to know. It is too easy to fall into the trap of using a presentation to express everything you know about a subject and therefore providing more information than the audience needs. Ned demonstrated how this could be done by formatting and presenting your slides in a way that helps people to learn, avoiding common pitfalls such as an over-reliance on bullet points and putting too much content on each slide. We were then given an opportunity to put this into practice when Ned provided us with three different methods to create effective presentations depending on how much time we had or what type of presentation we had to give. I thought the workshop was a good balance of theory and practice, we were given time to explore the resources and try out the new techniques.

After lunch we moved on to look at Prezi. Ned gave us a presentation on how to make the most of Prezi by utilising the useful features that it contains that Powerpoint doesn’t. Ned warned us that due to Prezi’s tendency to make some people feel seasick it is often best to only use it when there is a specific reason to justify its use. Through the presentation I learnt that Prezi does indeed have some unique content that distinguishes it from traditional presentations, the example that stood out the most was the ability to use Prezi to create an interactive map which could be used in a library setting to allow the user to explore the collection and seamlessly access tools and information on how to use resources. The day drew to a close by examining the practical aspects of giving a presentation. Ned gave us advice on how to deliver presentations and work with any nerves we might be experiencing.

It was encouraging to see the progress in the presentations I was able to create by the end of workshop compared to the basic Powerpoint and Prezi presentations I could make at the start. I am sure that the skills and techniques I developed at the workshop will be of assistance in my academic work this year and in any professional post I am able to gain after completing the course. I am giving a presentation in a few weeks time on special libraries in Manchester and I am excited to put my new presentation skills into use.

Thanks to Christine for her thoughts; tomorrow we’ll hear from the other student place winner, Katie Nicholas.

ARLG NW Event announcement – November 2014

Brand and Deliver with Kathy Ennis

ARLG NW are pleased to present a practical session with Kathy Ennis – mentor, trainer, public speaker – and librarian.

A library ‘brand’ is the sum of perceptions users and non-users have of the service. The library staff are key to influencing what people think and say and represent an immediate, tangible perception that the public associate with the qualities and value of that service.

Put simply: You are the Library; the Library is You!

In this practical session, Kathy will help you explore how to leverage your personal brand for personal and professional development and use brand principles to create and deliver engaging, quality library services.

Refreshments will be available during the afternoon.

 

Where? Manchester Central Library

When? Friday 28th November from 2-5pm

Cost?

£25 + VAT for non-members

£20 + VAT for CILIP members

Two FREE student places also offered on a first come, first served basis

To book your place, please email Dawn Grundy – D.Grundy@bolton.ac.uk  with the following details:

Name:

Institution (if applicable)

CILIP membership number (if applicable)

Name and address for invoicing

Access or support requirement

Please state if you would like a free student place – these will be offered on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.

 

Booking deadline: 20th November

 

ARLG Conference 2014 report – Part 2

Helen Monagle won the ARLG NW bursary to attend the ARLG Conference 2014. Her report on the conference is in 2 parts – you can read part 1 here.

ARLG photo 3The five key messages from the conference were the importance of demonstrating your value and service; adapt; work collaboratively; direct involvement (leading from the front)/engagement is essential and that alignment is critical. Things to bear in mind:

  • Use statistics/analytics to show your value, impact and relevance.
  • Marketing your service is vital – Katherine Rose (Regent’s University London) asserted in her workshop that we need to push ourselves outside of our comfort zones into promotion whilst remembering “no communication should be without purpose”. Action words are used at The Keep to engage and to show that the service is alive and relevant! (Fiona Courage, Special Collections Manager & Mass Observation Curator, University of Sussex – fourth keynote speaker).
  • Student endorsements are great when trying to prove the library’s value to the university – Madeleine Lefebvre (Chief Librarian, Ryerson University – third keynote speaker).
  • Demonstrate your niche skills as a way of promoting your service e.g. reviewing data management plans.
  • Importance of direct contact e.g. Regent’s University London found that direct contact and engaging with academics rather than students is what delivered results when promoting their new discovery service. Getting staff on board (academic buy in) is vital and led to being invited into classrooms to provide instruction to students. They also found that promoting the service via emails and training via drop in sessions didn’t work as well.
  • Madeleine – taking responsibility for things bigger than yourself ensures that you get noticed e.g. the library was involved in building the website and providing metadata for Winnie the bear exhibit and have also pioneered apps for enterprise.
  • Remember to know your limits re involvement – we can’t do everything!
  • To be able to adapt Paul Jeorrett (Head of Library, Glyndwr University – third keynote speaker) informed us that we need to take care of ourselves in order to be in a state to work with others and make the most of the changes whilst being mindful of your values and trying to hold to them.
  • You have to aligned with the academic plan!
  • On the topic of working collaboratively the following was said: (Madeleine) helping others gets you noticed; faculty support can be won just by being willing to help; you never give things away by working with others, in fact you gain way more! Working together is so productive (Paul). All of the challenges of working with new people/collections turn into positives; we are stronger together than apart; “the whole greater is than the sum of our parts” (Fiona).

The conference provided a valuable insight into what other academic libraries are doing in terms of service provision e.g. reviewing data management plans and LibAnswers[1] and how they are safeguarding their service by demonstrating their value and promoting the service.

Presentations from the conference can be found here: www.slideshare.net/ciliparlg/presentations

[1] An online reference platform that helps ensure that users get fast and accurate answers from their librarians and also provides detailed statistics.

ARLG Conference Report – Part 1

ARLG NW offered a bursary to the national ARLG conference. Helen Monagle, Principal Library Assistant at Manchester Metropolitan University was the winner of our bursary. Her report on the conference appears in 2 parts, today and on Monday.

The ARLG 2014 Conference entitled “Academic libraries the final frontier – to boldy go where you have never been before” took place over three days, 23rd – 25th June, at the University of Sussex. Without a bursary from ARLG North West branch I would not have been able to attend this conference; as such I am extremely grateful.

ARLG photo 1

Welcome to the conference!

I began my conference experience by taking part in a Taylor and Francis focus group discussion focusing on The Use of Social Media (SM) in the Library which will be used to inform the White Paper they are producing on the topic. The focus included Using SM Tools in Your Library; User Engagement & Perception of Your Use of SM in the Library, amongst other topics. This was a great start to the conference which allowed me to express my opinions on these topics, learn from others and to engage with some of the delegates before the conference officially began.

The conference programme was packed; four key note speakers, nine workshop sessions, a quiz and gala dinner. There were 45 workshops in total covering the following key topics:

  • Teaching and learning
  • Research support
  • Shared services
  • Learning spaces
  • Electronic resources
  • CPD

In order to gain the most from the conference I attempted to attend at least one workshop covering the above topics whilst maintaining a focus on electronic resources, as this is more suitable to my current role. Given the multitude of presentations over the course of the conference (I attended all four key note sessions and eight workshops) I will not be able to provide detail on all of them so I will aim to sum up the key messages of the conference.

The conference began with an uplifting welcome from Kitty Inglis, University Librarian at the University of Sussex, who informed us that despite the increasing pressure upon us to demonstrate our services, value etc. we are very well placed in the Higher Education arena as agile adopters of technology to make them our own e.g. shared services, students as co-creators, MOOCs, Open Access etc.

Kitty’s welcome was followed by the first keynote speaker for the conference, John Purcell from Durham University with his presentation “To boldly go…stretching the envelope and making us indispensable”. John continued in the inspiration vein by informing us that it was important to remember that librarians are in control (the slogan on his t-shirt read “Librarian in Control”), especially in a time where libraries are taking on new roles and fresh challenges. During his presentation John asked the audience to raise their hand if they had had their responsibilities increased in the last year – over half the room raised their hand; thus demonstrating the “stretching of our envelopes” as librarians roles are well and truly stretched. Why is this the case? John explained that are librarians are good managers, professional, confident, engaged, valued, provide a neutral service and have a strong understanding of users viewpoints; in summary we are indispensable to our organisations! In order for the profession to live long and prosper we must make sure we are engaged, aligned and relevant to our institutions or RAE:

  • Relevance (of provision) –delivery of academic services, teaching, content management –print and electronic, research support, user support.
  • Alignment (with strategy) – is about partnering and promoting across the institution whilst distinguishing students needs & wants; this is critical as we need to be completely aligned with our institution and students. We need to decide what activities add value and get involved by leading from front. However it is important to be careful who you align with in terms of your strategic positioning/partnerships.
  • Engagement (with everybody) –partnership roles e.g. JISC, SCONUL; internal & external projects; academic liaison; shared services; academic writing e.g. SCONUL Focus, CILIP Update etc; externality e.g. conferences, CILIP, SCONUL; benchmarking which is critically useful.

It is also about making choices – we can’t do everything so we need to bear in mind the mantra John uses “stop starting and start stopping”. In order to “future proof” and make ourselves RAE we need to use some of these techniques: SWOT analyses; process reviews; benchmarking against our competitors; institutional visits in order to learn from others; scenario planning; remain professionally engaged and aware[1]; take bounded risks; continue service development. John purported that the “best way to predict the future is to invent it”. We need to make ourselves indispensable and prove it:

  • Carry out skills analysis to identify what we are lacking and rectify it.
  • Be a willing change agent – lead the changes rather than being followers.
  • Be agile, responsive, creative and innovative.

John concluded his keynote by confirming that ‘it’s a great time to be a Librarian in academic libraries’. John’s keynote not only provided practical tips on how to survive during these challenging times but was also uplifting as it reinforced the notion that we are skilled professionals with a vital role to play.

[1] John suggested that Library Schools should enable us to dip in and out in order to keep our skills up to date – this would be great!

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