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ARLG NW presents Social media: Can you tell if it’s working yet?

Date: Friday 1st July 2016, 1.30 (for a 1.45pm start) to 4.30pm

Location: Manchester Central Library

Event description:
ARLG NW are pleased to announce our summer event, “Social media: Can you tell if it’s working yet?”

So your service has started dabbling in social media, or you’ve been working on it for a while. But do you know if it’s working? Is it worth the time and effort you’re putting in? And do you know what your goals are? What’s the point of your social media presence? This afternoon event will address all these questions and more. This event is suitable for people at all stages of planning for their social media presence.

Outline of afternoon

1.30pm-1.45pm Arrival for 1.45pm start

1.45pm – 2.30pm  Experiences of social media, policy and practice

Sarah Mallen, Information & guidance coordinator at University of Manchester Careers Service & Michelle Bond, Faculty Librarian at Liverpool Hope University 

Sarah and Michelle will talk about their experiences of running social media accounts for their services, with a focus on process and why it’s important to get organised and set goals. They’ll consider important questions such as “what do you hope to achieve?” and “what messages do you want to get across?”

2.15pm – 3.00pm Tom Mason, Social Media Coordinator, Communications & Marketing, The University of Manchester

Tom will be talking about social media from a wider university perspective, covering areas such as which social media to use, analytics, and tips and tricks to encourage engagement.

3-3.15pm Refreshments

3.15pm-4.00pm Creating your social media framework / policy – activity

Working in small groups, attendees will have the opportunity to start work on their own social media framework or policy, specific to their institution. This is also an opportunity to exchange experiences with other attendees, and get support from Sarah, Michelle and Tom in creating your own policy.

4pm-4.30pm   Your experiences – Advice & questions from the floor

The final session is for attendees to share experiences with the wider group and ask any final questions of the presenters or other attendees. We’ll bring together the strands of the afternoon and try to create a master list of tips.

Booking information:

Cost?  £20 + VAT for non-members

£15 + VAT for CILIP members

£5 for students

To book your place, please email Annette Ramsden ARamsden@uclan.ac.uk with the following details:

Name:

Institution (if applicable)

CILIP membership number (if applicable)

Name and address for invoicing

Access or support requirement

Booking deadline: Friday 17th June 2016

CILIP’s Professional Knowledge and Skills Base (PKSB) – this event is linked to the following criteria:

  1. Customer focus, service design and marketing: 11.2 Communicating with stakeholders
  2. IT and communication: 12.4 Social Media and Collaborative Tools
  3. IT and communication: 12.5 Communication Skills
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Event report 2: Making your message stick, with Ned Potter

ARLG NW and CILIP NW offered 2 free student places for our October event, Making your message stick, with Ned Potter. We’re pleased to present write-ups from both students. We published the first yesterday, by Christine Tate. Today is Katie Nicholas’ turn. Katie’s a student at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Prior to this training I had a basic understanding of how to create a PowerPoint but Ned’s training introduced me to so many features I had never made proper use of, including picture formatting options and textbox features. Tips about using minimal space on the slide and the importance of fonts have already been incredibly useful for presentations I am delivering at university and for work.

Ned introduced us to a plethora of great websites where one can source images to create backgrounds without breaching any copyright laws or licenses. The time provided in the session to try each resource and experiment with PowerPoint meant I could ask questions whilst using the new tools. This meant I felt more equipped to use them on my own after the session. The training also gave advice on using these techniques in real-world situations such as working with organisational templates and branding.

The training offered advice on lowering the risk of technical issues by describing the anatomy of a slide and issues with projector alignment – for example not placing vital points near the top or bottom of a slide where they may be lost or obstructed by members of the audience or the projector screen. It is easy to forget about delivering a presentation for real when you are immersed in creating content, making the presentation aesthetically pleasing and remembering what to say so this was a welcome reminder.

The afternoon sessions gave an introduction to Prezi and an overview of presentation and communication skills. I was aware of Prezi but had never used it and was unsure how it worked. Ned effectively used a Prezi to explain the features, pros and cons and most importantly when not to use it. The main message I took away was that Prezi is great for specific kinds of presentations but should be used with caution. Practice is also a necessity! The interactivity and zoom in and out features are fantastic for dipping in and out of material or if you want a more holistic approach as the user sees the whole presentation from the start. Ned advised us to map out our Prezi before adding text and images in the online templates to create more cohesive end results – this was helpful as it is quite a different way of approaching presentations compared to PowerPoint where you can input a structure into slides and amend the visual features later.

By outlining the pitfalls and strengths of Prezi I felt more comfortable experimenting with the templates available and armed with enough knowledge to know when it may be appropriate to use.

The final session gave concise and cohesive advice about planning and preparing any presentation. The importance of researching, structuring and practicing your presentation was highlighted and tips like using the 3:3:3 approach will help organise my ideas in future. Tips on timing information on slides, rehearsing and familiarising yourself with the material and not just memorising will all help me deliver better presentations.

The day has given me lots of resources, tips and real-world advice that I am already venturing to use and has reminded me of the effectiveness and potential of PowerPoint when used in different ways.

Thanks to both Christine and Katie for their thoughts, and to Ned for hosting the workshop.

Event report: Brand and Deliver with Kathy Ennis

ARLG NW offered two free student places to our Autumn/Winter event, Brand and Deliver with Kathy Ennis. Lucía Meijueiro is a library and information management student at Manchester Metropolitan University and kindly wrote this blog post for us with her thoughts on the afternoon. Thanks to Lucía, and to Kathy for such an interesting workshop.

Last November, I attended the event ‘Brand and Deliver with Kathy Ennis’ organised by the ARLG NW in the newly refurbished Manchester Central Library.

Kathy Ennis, a mentor, trainer and personal branding consultant with a background in library and information services, led this workshop. She provided an enjoyable and informative workshop where we learnt about brands, with a special focus on personal brands and their relevance for service provision and potential career development.

Theory and practice

Basic concepts and key ideas on brand theory and its importance in a professional context were presented and highlighted through the afternoon. The workshop worked really well thanks to interactive group tasks that helped to reflect on what pictures and personal image can tell as a first impression, what you can say of a brand just by looking at a logo or a shopping bag and the overall relevance of brands and logos for service recognition in a time when ‘visual literacy’ is becoming increasingly important.

Brands and its importance

Defining brand as ‘a collection of thoughts and feelings that customers have about a particular product or service’ goes further than just a logo and shows the importance of recognition of a service by the customer, of what they can expect and what they feel about it.

A brand is key to communicating with customers and to have a good one you have to reflect on what you really want to get users to identify with you and your service.

The 4 Vs Principle

Values, visuals, vocals and verbals are the four Vs in this principle. Following these Vs contributes to focus your message, your intended audience and to create a successful brand that communicates what you intend and defines your identity and services accurately. Consistency plays a key role to keep all the different components of your personal brand together.

I would like to thank the ARLG NW for the sponsored student free place and the opportunity to attend this interesting and useful event.

 

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